Search the Internet

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Search Engines

Best Search Tools Chart
The table outlines differences between major search engines (Google, Bing, and Yahoo!), and also lesser known ones. Includes tips on how to use them effectively.

Duck Duck Go
A search engine that does not track queries entered by users.

Internet Archive
The Wayback Machine allows you to search for earlier versions of web sites and track pages that are no longer online.

Metasearch Engines

Metasearch engines use several different search engines to produce a list of search results.

Subject Directories

Subject directories are web sites that list links to freely accessible online resources, usually organized by category.

Infomine
Maintained by librarians from the University of California, the directory lists various types of resources (databases, electronic journals, electronic books) for faculty, scholars, and students.

The Internet Public Library
ipl2 lists freely available resources by subject. Also includes links to international newspapers and magazines.

Digital Librarian: A Librarian’s Choice of the Best of the Web
Extensive lists of resources on popular and academic topics.

Open Directory Project
Contains links to various popular topics, organized by subject.

The Invisible Web

The Invisible Web refers to online content that is not indexed by search engines.

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine
Powered by Bielefeld University Library, the search tool indexes academic, open-access resources, such as books, articles, and reports. Searches by author, title, subject, and content of documents.

Yovisto: Academic Video Search
A search engine that specializes in educational content, such as lectures and conferences.

Social Science Research Network
SSRN is an international group of researchers committed to sharing their scholarship world wide. The content is not restricted to social sciences, and includes humanities, law, and other disciplines.

Data.gov
Open-source web site of the US government that includes data, tools, and resources, listed by topic (education, health, weather, etc.)

Evaluating Web Resources

Critical Evaluation of Web Resources
Outlines five criteria that can be used to evaluate the usefulness, currency, and objectivity of a web site.

updated by: Agatha Barc

Last updated: August 14, 2014

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